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Locked Out of the Market X

The Gap between Rent Supplement/HAP Limits and Market Rents’

Research

The Simon Communities latest Locked Out of the Market X snapshot study shows that only 7% of properties available to rent are available within Rent Supplement (RS) /Housing Assistance Payment (HAP) levels. The study was conducted over three consecutive days – 13th, 14th and 15th of February 2018. This is the tenth study in the Locked Out of the Market series.

 

There were just 538 properties available to rent across the eleven locations during this snapshot study. This is a decrease of 54% when compared to May 2015, when the first Locked Out of the Market study was carried out and there were 1,150 properties available. One year ago, 600 properties were available to rent.

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Women Homelessness & Service Provision

Women’s experience of homelessness can differ significantly from their male counterparts in terms of the causes of their homelessness, their experiences while homeless and their pathways out of homelessness. For example women’s homelessness is often more hidden and they often have experienced trauma, abuse and violence as children or in intimate relationships.

Research would indicate that there is a gendered dimension to women’s homeless but that this has been relatively underexplored. This report aims to explore some of these themes in the Irish context as well as looking at some of the risk and vulnerability factors more generally.


women and homelessness guideWomen and Homelessness Resource Guide. This guide is for service providers and focuses on exploring and highlighting the needs of women who are homeless. The guide is informed by the findings and learning arising from Women and Homelessness in Ireland. Service use Patterns and Service Needs a 2015 study commissioned by the Simon Communities in Ireland.


Simon Communities’ snapshot study: ‘Locked Out of the Market II: 

The Gap between Rent Supplement/HAP Limits and Market Rents’ looks at the current state of Ireland’s rental market and its effects on the country’s most vulnerable people.

This study follows up on Locked Out of the Market report done in June 2015, tracking the growing gap between rising market rents and the Rent Supplement / Housing Assistance Payment (HAP) limits, which have remained unchanged since 2013. By tracking the number of properties available to rent within these state support limits in ten regions throughout the country, the study will shows just how far these payments are from the market and how far things have deteriorated in the past three months.

You can read the full report here.


Locked Out of the Market: The Gap between Rent Supplement/HAP Limits and Market Rents

'Locked Out of the Market: The Gap between Rent Supplement/HAP Limits and Market Rents’ highlights the growing disparity between rising rents and Rent Supplement / Housing Assistance Payments (HAP) limits for which have remained unchanged since June 2013.

Conducted over three days in May 2015 and in ten regions across Ireland. the snapshot study tracked rental properties found on properties website Daft.ie and compared their rents to the Rent Supplement/HAP limits in each region and in four categories: single person, couple, couple or one parent with one child, and couple or one parent with two children.

The study found that just 12% (138) of the 1,150 properties available to rent on the website in the ten regions at that time were available with Rent Supplement/HAP limits. You can read the full report, including more detailed regional findings, here.


which way home

Which Way Home? The Experiences of the Simon Communities Introducing Housing Led Services

As a follow up to our Finding the Way Home research and in light of the Government’s commitment to end long term homelessness by implementing a housing-led approach, the Simon Communities in Ireland commissioned a piece of research to explore the experiences of the Simon Communities introducing housing-led services.  The research was undertaken by Mark Bevan with Nicholas Pleace of the Centre for Housing Policy in York University and was designed to help inform and critically assess the use of housing-led services as a response to homelessness at both a national and local level. A summary can also be found here



left out in the coldLeft Out In The Cold: A Review of Rural Homelessness In Ireland

The key aims of the paper were:
• To explore the experience of rural homelessness in Ireland especially among the eight Simon Communities in Ireland.
• To explain how rural homelessness can differ from urban homelessness and some of the challenges that arise, both for people experiencing homeless and those at risk, and service providers.
• To explore Government Commitments in relation to homelessness and the current policy context.
• Give recommendations addressing the issues identified
 

Recommendations focus on the  following areas:
• Homelessness Policy 
• Housing First/Led Approaches 
• Resources 
• Tailored services to meet local/regional needs 
• Housing Supply 
• Flexible support 
• Innovative responses 
• Inclusion of people who are homeless in rural specific schemes and developments.

The research was undertaken by the Simon Communities of Ireland National Office in conjunction with eight Simon Communities.


Homelessness, Ageing and Dying: Exploratory research looking at the needs of older people, who are homeless, as they age, and are faced with the serious issues of ill health and dying

There is a lack of information about the exact number of people who are homeless and the nature of the homelessness at any one point in Ireland. There is also a lack of information on the physical and mental health needs of people who are homeless and particularly among older people who are homeless or formerly homeless. The overall aim of this study was to explore the needs of older people who are homeless as they age and are faced with the issues of serious ill health, dying and death. The research identified a number of issues when working with people who are older, homeless and experiencing serious health issues including the importance of:

• Access to appropriate health care and services which contribute to good health and well-being.
• The need for end of life care.
• Access to suitable and stable accommodation.
• The key role of support in accommodation.

For the full report, please click here


way home

Finding the Way Home: Housing led responses and the Homelessness Strategy in Ireland

In light of the Government’s commitment to end long term homelessness by implementing a housing-led approach, the Simon Communities in Ireland commissioned a piece of research to explore the potential effectiveness of housing-led services in meeting the needs of people who are homeless with support needs in Ireland. 

The research was undertaken by the Nicholas Pleace and Joanne Bretherton of the Centre for Housing Policy in the University of York and was designed to help inform and critically assess the use of housing-led services as response to homelessness at both a national and local level. 

If you would like to read the research in more detail 

Please click here for the Full report.

Please click here for the Summary. 


Simon National Health Snapshot Study Report 2011

High rates of poor physical and mental health, problem alcohol and drug use, self-harm and attempted suicide are just some of the findings of a Simon Snapshot study of over 600 people using Simon projects and services throughout the country. 

A snapshot is a ‘point in time’ picture during a particular sample time period, in this case one week. This snapshot report focuses on the profile and health needs of some of the people using Simon projects and services during the week in question. 

For the full report please click here

For the briefing note please click here


Health & Homelessness - Health Snapshot Study of People using Simon Projects and Services in Ireland

There are many different reasons why a person becomes homeless, but generally the explanation lies in a combination of structural factors (such as poverty or unemployment) and personal factors (such as family breakdown or health problems). What is clear is that once a person becomes homeless, the deterioration in their physical and mental health can be both rapid and debilitating.

This Health Snap Shotstudy attempts to address an information deficit in relation to some of the people who use Simon projects and services around the country. It explores health status, both physical and mental; drug and alcohol use and the health implications; and access to medical services amongst other issues. Understanding the health needs of people who become homeless is critical to developing, designing and improving, not only homeless services, but also health and other related services.

This study was conducted during a one week period from July 26th to August 1st 2010. Seven hundred and eighty-eight (788) people participated in this research, a sample of people using Simon Community projects and services during this one week. It is important to note that this is not all of the people who were in contact with the Simon Communities during the week in question. This snapshot study is however a significant sample of people who use the projects and services and thus can be used as a basis to generalise about the health and support needs of people who use Simon services


Full Report


Multiple Barriers, Multiple Solutions: Inclusion Into and Through Employment
For People Who are Homeless in Europe - National Report for Ireland -An overview of thebarriers faced by people experiencing homelessness to securing employment in Ireland. The report includes an examination of the employment profile of people who are homeless; the specific barriers to employment; the policy and legal context; employment initiatives that are in place for people experiencing homelessness; training for employers to reduce barriers; cooperation between stakeholders; funding of interventions to reduce barriers; data collection and research; employment rights; and indicators and success factors. Published in July 2007, this was the Simon Communities of Ireland response to the FEANTSA Annual Theme Questionnaire.


Full report

Settlement First: An Assessment of the Efficacy of the 1988 Housing Act and the Integrated Strategy in meeting the needs of people who are homeless -A comprehensive contemporary analysis of the efficacy of current homelessness legislation and policy in meeting the housing needs of people who are homeless. It recommends a fundamental shift in policy towards a 'settlement first' model - ie meeting housing needs as a first priority.


Executive Summary

Full report Part I

Full report Part II


Housing Access for All? -This research, jointly undertaken with Focus Ireland, Threshold and Society of St Vincent de Paul examines the Housing Strategies and Homeless Action Plans in 2002.


Executive Summary

Full report

Volunteer With Simon

Volunteers are at the heart of all we do in the Simon Community, volunteers are essential to the work we do. 

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What is Homelessness?

There are many reasons why a person becomes homeless, in Simon we deal with them all.

read more